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Cardiac arrest survivor wants others to learn life-saving skill

Cardiac arrest survivor wants others to learn life-saving skill

Survivor: '[I was] clinically dead, and I was that way for 20 minutes'   

Sudden cardiac arrest kills 1,000 people a day in the U.S., which is roughly one person every two minutes.  Would you know what to do if you saw someone collapse in front of you?

Channel3000.com and WISC-TV are proud to partner with St. Mary’s Hospital on Saturday for Hands on Hearts -- a community-wide event offering free compression-only CPR .

COCPR is a hands-only technique to help those in sudden cardiac arrest. The constant compressions are performed 100 times a minute to the center of a patient's chest. The compressions keep oxygen-rich blood flowing to the heart and brain. Mouth-to-mouth rescue breaths are not needed.

When compression-only CPR is used on a victim of cardiac arrest, the chance of surviving increases greatly.

Distracted driving simulator at Middleton HS

A distracted driving simulator shows Middleton students how dangerous it can be.

 

Raptor experts ask observers not to disturb owl

Raptor experts ask observers not to disturb owl

Humane Society encourages watchers to keep distance  

Since a rare owl was spotted last week in Middleton, curious watchers and birders from near and far have stopped by to get a peek at it.

Clarence "Owl Man" Cameron, a Madison artist who's been sculpting owls for 46 years, said the normally rarely seen great grey is characterized by its deceptively large head, which is mostly plumage.

"Their heads are actually rather small, [what you see] is just about all feathers," Cameron said.

Dane County Humane Society’s Four Lakes Wildlife Center, a wildlife rehabilitation program, has been monitoring the great grey owl in Middleton. Wildlife Center representatives said keeping distance is for the better wellness of the bird.

Brooke Lewis, wildlife rehab supervisor with DCHS, said the great grey will eventually need to return back north, which will require peak health.

State offers safety reminders for daylight saving

State offers safety reminders for daylight saving

It's almost time to spring forward, and Wisconsin officials are using the occasion to remind residents about home safety.

Daylight saving time begins Sunday, when Wisconsinites will set the clocks ahead one hour. Safety officials said the event marks a convenient reminder to do annual checks.

For example:

  • Consider replacing the batteries in smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors
  • If you don't have an emergency kit at home, now's the time to get one
  • If you do have an emergency kit, put fresh batteries in the flashlight and make sure the food, water and first-aid kit are all in good condition

The Wisconsin Department of Military Affairs has additional safety tips on its website.

Pickleball complex opening in Middleton

Kirk Lingner talks about a new Pickleball complex opening in Middleton.

 

Free massage workshop to teach self-care

Free massage workshop to teach self-care

College students to host session at Middleton Library Dec. 6

A free workshop on self-massage techniques will take place Dec. 6 at the Middleton Public Library on Hubbard Avenue.

The class, hosted by students from career college Globe University-Madison West, will take place from 6 p.m.-8 p.m.

"Self-Care Through Massage” class participants will learn different ways to practice massage techniques by using simple household items such as tube socks and tennis balls. They will also learn easy ways to de-stress and relieve muscle tension.

The class is free and open to the public.

Contact community manager at Globe University-Madison West Jennifer Hilgendorf for more information.

Transplant recovery house opens in Middleton

Transplant recovery house opens in Middleton

The Restoring Hope Transplant House opened Wednesday after years of work.

The house in Middleton offers organ and bone marrow recipients a place to stay while they focus on their recovery.

The house, located on Terrace Avenue, will serve as a home away from home for families getting transplants at the University of Wisconsin Hospital in Madison.

Patients will find guest rooms, living spaces and experienced staff. It costs $35 dollars to stay at Restoring Hope per night, unlike hotels, which can cost more than $100.

"We are full of gratitude for those that have actually helped us get there,"Cindy Herbst, executive director of the Restoring Hope Transplant House, said. "As a nonprofit, you never do it alone. You need those people in the community, those donors and those friends that come together and say, 'We understand.'"